Philip-Lorca diCorcia at David Zwirner, Chelsea

Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Mount Ararat, Pennsylvania, 2012 from the East of Eden series at David Zwirner, Chelsea image ©MAIERMOUL
Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Mount Ararat, Pennsylvania, 2012 from the East of Eden series at David Zwirner, Chelsea image ©MAIERMOUL

When I came to New York in the early 1980s, I just couldn’t afford to be a freak. I think of freaks as somewhat self-indulgent.

It’s like a block party: You have no money and you get together and make spaghetti and pretend you’re rich, or you really are rich and you pretend that you’re not.

To some degree, the “East of Eden” series was generated by anger. Which is not an unusual emotion for me, but it has a weird place within the realm of art.

– 500 Words: Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Artforum, March 27, 2015

 

Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Iolanda, 2011 from the East of Eden series at David Zwirner, Chelsea image ©MAIERMOUL
Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Iolanda, 2011
from the East of Eden series at David Zwirner, Chelsea image ©MAIERMOUL

I don’t get up close and cuddly with my subjects,” he said. “I didn’t follow these people home. It’s not a documentary.” He argues that creating intimacy between photographer and subject doesn’t pay off anyway. “I think it’s all an illusion,” he said. “That there’s a perfect rapport established in the best work is false.”
Arthur Lubow, Real People, Contrived Settings: Philip-Lorca Dicorcia, The New York Times August 23, 2013

“Work of different sizes, hung all over the place, different formats, abstract to hyper personal. I’m almost ashamed to be associated with this kind of thing.”   – Philip-Lorca diCorcia, East of Eden, Sophie Balhetchet, Hotshoe, Winter 2012

I didn’t plan to do that, to be honest. Some of the best photographs are the ones where you’ve sort of got a vague idea in your mind and head towards it and then get diverted into something that you didn’t expect and it turns out to be better.

– Philip-Lorca diCorcia, The Art of Throwing Darts, Robert Shore, Elephant, Winter 2013

Philip-Lorca diCorcia, The Hamptons, 2008 from the East of Eden series at David Zwirner, Chelsea image ©MAIERMOUL
Philip-Lorca diCorcia, The Hamptons, 2008
from the East of Eden series at David Zwirner, Chelsea image ©MAIERMOUL

Suddenly people realised that they don’t get everything for free; that you can’t have a mortgage that you don’t have to pay back; that you can’t constantly leverage your life on your credit card. And we’d been led into two wars that were disastrous failures and misguided to begin with. I just took that as a jumping-off point for the imagery.

With the Heads or the Hustlers, those images have a self-generating metaphorical quality. With these [recent pictures] it was much harder in a way. I kind of impose it upon the image deliberately. These are much more contrived in their metaphorical content and it’s a really delicate thing to get away with.

– Philip-Lorca diCorcia, The Lost Eden Liz Jobey, Financial Times Magazine, August 31, 2013